Shakshuka for One

This Shakshuka for One recipe makes a simple hot breakfast, lunch, or dinner for when you’re just cooking for yourself. After only a little effort, adding the ingredients as the dish cooks, you’ll be diving into a dish that’s regularly enjoyed all over Israel, the Middle East, Northern Africa, in your home, and mine.

Read on find detailed step by step instructions and learn all about variations of eggs poached in tomato sauce around the world. Or grab your cast iron pan, hit that Jump to Recipe button, and let’s make an easy shakshuka recipe for one person. That means you!

shakshuka for one person in small cast iron pan with eggs, feta, and herbs.
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Ingredients

cast iron pan and ingredients for shakshuka on a countertop.

Shakshuka is a popular Middle Eastern and North African dish consisting of eggs poached in a spicy tomato and red pepper sauce. It’s typically flavored with cumin and paprika and often sprinkled with feta and fresh herbs.

 

To make shakshuka for one person, you’ll want an ingredient list that doesn’t leave you with a half-used can of tomatoes. Here’s how we’ll do it:

  • Red onion – use only part of an onion, or substitute a shallot to use the whole thing.
  • Red pepper – use the whole thing!
  • Tomatoes – use ripe cherry tomatoes instead of canned. If you buy a pint, and don’t know what to do with extras, try my orzo pesto salad or pink sauce pasta with sauteed cherry tomatoes.
  • Garlic – finely chop as many cloves as your heart tells you a shakshuka recipe needs.
  • Tomato paste – buy your tomato paste in a squeeze tube, and you can store it in your fridge for all your future sauces, soups, and cheesy bean tomato bakes that need a bit more oomph!
  • Harissa – a condiment made with roasted peppers and chili peppers, garlic, olive oil, and various spices. You can buy hot or mild versions.
  • Feta – the salty, creaminess of feta provides a nice counterpoint to the spicy, tangy flavors of shakshuka. Please feel free to make your shakshuka with goat cheese or skip the cheese altogether.

Cast iron cooking

A six and a half-inch Lodge skillet is perfect for this shakshuka for one, or use one slightly larger. Cast iron is great because it’s inexpensive, holds heat well, and goes from stove top to oven. I have a range of cast iron skillets, Dutch ovens, and a griddle to make things like my pan-roasted chicken breasts, bacon kale frittata, Dutch oven pulled chicken, sweet potato pancakes, pinto bean burgers, and so on!

Please see the recipe card below for complete information on ingredients and quantities.

Variations and substitutions

  • You can finish your shakshuka under the broiler or break apart the yolks if you don’t like runny eggs.
  • Add a handful of spinach or kale or another green.
  • Make it spicier by adding cayenne or another chili pepper to the spice mixture.
  • Feel free to scale up to make shakshuka recipe for more than one person. When making it for family dinner, we’ll use a 10-inch cast iron skillet, a can of tomatoes, and eight eggs.

Eggs poached in tomatoes around the world

Wikipedia tells me that Maghrebi Jews brought shakshuka to Israel, but its origins are uncertain. Eggs poached in tomatoes or tomato sauce is one of those fascinating foods that is found around the world, whether by migration or convergent evolution.

There’s an Indian version that Meera Sodha calls Bombay Eggs in her fabulous cookbook, Made in India. It’s Oeufs a la Provencale in France. Uova in Purgatorio (Eggs in Purgatory) in Italy. Perhaps huevos ahogados (drowned eggs) is coincidence. And green shakshuka a modern adaptation.

Recipe tips and tricks

The beauty of this easy shakshuka recipe is that you just add one thing to your pan, right after another. There’s no need to prep anything – just chop as you go!

Step 1: Turn the heat on to medium low and add the olive oil. When it is hot, add the chopped onion, stir, and cook until soft, about 5 minutes.

cast iron pan with chopped purple onions on stove top.

Step 2: Add the chopped red peppers and stir to mix with the onions.

cast iron pan with purple onions and red peppers on stove top.

Step 3: Add the cherry tomatoes and stir in to the mixture. Feel free to use cherry tomatoes in a variety of colors just for fun!

cast iron pan with chopped vegetables on stove top.

Step 4: Finely mince the garlic and add it to the pan.

garlic on chopped vegetables in pan of shakshuka for one.

Step 5: Add the tomato paste, harissa, cumin, salt, paprika, black pepper, and cayenne, if using, and stir to mix.

cast iron pan with cooked tomatoes and peppers for shakshuka for one person.

Step 6: Let cook a few minutes, then add half of the feta and stir it in.

Step 7: Use your spoon or spatula to create a large well in the shaksuka mixture for each egg. Then, carefully, as low as you feel comfortable, crack an egg and gently split apart the shell to let the egg fall intact into the indentation you created.

two hands showing how to crack eggs into the shakshuka pan.

The egg yolk and most of the egg white should stay in the hollow you’ve created in the shakshuka mixture.

two egg yolks in a cast iron pan of shakshuka for one person.

Step 8: Cover the pan and continue to cook over medium-low heat until the egg sets to your desired consistency.- You can finish your shakshuka under the broiler or break apart the yolks if you don’t like runny eggs.

two poached eggs in a cast iron pan of shakshuka.

Step 9: To serve, sprinkle with the remaining feta and the chopped herbs.

What to serve with shakshuka

Shakshuka is most commonly eaten at breakfast, but you can enjoy it as a main course any time of day:

Israeli couscous and plate of shakshuka for one person.

Recipe FAQs

How do you pronounce “shakshuka?”

Shakshuka (also shakshouka and chakchouka) comes from the Arabic and is typically pronounced “shock-shoe-ka.”

Can I make shakshuka ahead of time?

Shakshuka is best enjoyed fresh, but you can prepare the tomato and pepper sauce up until the point of adding the cheese. Refrigerate this mixture for a few days or freeze for three months. Slowly reheat the cooked tomato and pepper mixture in your cast iron pan, and then proceed with the recipe as written.

Can I store leftovers?

Yes, though it really is better fresh. Store any leftover shakshuka in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Reheat it gently on the stove or in the microwave.

What can I do with leftover feta?

We love feta over all sorts of salads – green salads, Greek salads, watermelon salads. You can also use it for that viral Uuni feta pasta from a few years ago, or bake with it like in these spinach and feta muffins.

Is shakshuka healthy?

With about 250 calories, 13 grams of protein, and 15 grams of fat, this shakshuka recipe for one is a healthy dish when made as a part of a balanced diet.

Check out other Middle Eastern and Mediterranean-inspired recipes from the Ugly Duckling Bakery archives like:

Love this recipe? Please leave a 5-heart 💜💜💜💜💜 rating in the recipe card below. Let me know how much you loved it, or any problems you had, in the comments section further down.

Recipe

Shakshuka for One

5 from 1 vote
Category: Breakfast
Cuisine: Jewish, Mediterranean, middle eastern
Diet: Vegetarian
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 1
Calories: 262kcal
This Shakshuka for One is a classic shakshuka recipe made with eggs poached in a slightly spicy red pepper and tomato sauce. Just for you.
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Equipment

  • 1 small cast iron or other frying pan and lid

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • ¼ medium red onion or whole shallot finely chopped
  • 1 red pepper finely chopped
  • 6 to 8 cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1 to 3 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon harissa mild or spicy, plus more to taste
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika I like smoked paprika here if you have it.
  • teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 pinch cayenne optional, plus more to taste
  • 1 ounce feta crumbled, divided
  • 1 to 2 eggs
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, mint, cilantro, basil, or combination for garnish

Instructions

  • Turn the heat on the pan to medium low and add the olive oil. When it is hot, add the chopped onion, stir, and cook until soft, about 5 minutes.
    1 teaspoon olive oil, ¼ medium red onion or whole shallot
  • Meanwhile, chop the red pepper and mix it with the onions.
    1 red pepper
  • Slice the cherry tomatoes in half and stir them into the shakshuka mixture.
    6 to 8 cherry tomatoes
  • Finely mince the garlic and add it to the pan.
    1 to 3 garlic cloves
  • Add the tomato paste, harissa, cumin, salt, paprika, black pepper,and cayenne, if using, and stir to mix.
    1 tablespoon tomato paste, 1 teaspoon harissa, ½ teaspoon cumin, ¼ teaspoon salt, ¼ teaspoon paprika, ⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper, 1 pinch cayenne
  • Let cook for a few minutes, then stir in half of the feta.
    1 ounce feta
  • Use your spoon or spatula to create a large indentation in the shaksuka mixture for each egg. Carefully, as low as you feel comfortable,crack an egg and gently split apart the shell to let the egg fall intact into the indentation you created.
    1 to 2 eggs
  • Cover the pan and continue to cook over medium-low heat until the egg sets to your desired consistency. You can finish your shakshuka under the broiler or break apart the yolks if you don't like runny eggs.
  • To serve, sprinkle with the remaining feta and the chopped herbs.
    1 to 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, mint, cilantro, basil, or combination

Notes

The beauty of making a shakshuka recipe for one person is that the timing works so you just add one thing to your pan, right after another. There’s no need to prep anything – just chop as you go!

Nutrition

Calories: 262kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Protein: 13g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 6g | Trans Fat: 0.02g | Cholesterol: 189mg | Sodium: 1182mg | Potassium: 833mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 12g | Vitamin A: 5292IU | Vitamin C: 190mg | Calcium: 219mg | Iron: 4mg
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2 Comments

  1. Only people with a tendency to anemia (women who menstruate, people with bleeding ulcers, etc) or actual anemia can eat acidic foods cooked in cast iron. The acid of tomato, pepper, wine, vinegar, etc pulls iron into the food. I know people who have gotten iron poisoning from this and it took weeks or months to get over.

5 from 1 vote (1 rating without comment)

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